1975 Centurion (718_059)



This bike (1975 Centurion...history) came into the shop as a trade-in. A woman had initially wanted to convert this frame to a fixed gear (all 40lbs of it), but she then fell in love with a track bike we had in stock so she traded in this classic.  It was in pretty good shape, albeit dirty.  Also, it had 2 low quality u-locks attached that I had a tough time removing.  This frame has been reserved for an upcoming, so I have started the prep process.


Lots of grime after living untouched in a basement for 20 years, but below teh surface was a great lugged frame.


I removed the headset and set them in my hi-tech parts washer (a used sushi tray with de-greaser solution).  These will soak for a few days before the parts are removed and polished to their former glory. I try very hard to reuse headset components, as the original parts have grown old together with the frame.  introducing a new headset is like introducing a new organ into the body, sometimes its rejected.


The frame itself needed a good scrubbing, so again de-greaser solution and a soft wire brush


A sort of mockup


The fork had  a decent amount of surface rust and dirt on the lower chome part...a Dremmel with a steel brush attachment makes short work of it

(left ="before, right = "after")


Getting a good seatpost fit is always a challenge on vintage road frames, as the generally is some frame warp over time.  I usually have a wide selection of seatposts, just for this occasion.  This guy turned out to be a non-standard 25.8mm


I built up these wheels using Velocity Razor rims, All-City hubs and DT Swiss double-butted spokes (294mm)


On many vintage frames, the threading on the fork has some damage or wear which makes fitting a headset difficult after restoration.  Here I am chasing the fork threads; cleaning and re-cutting the threads where damaged.


Similarly, and more prevalent, is damage to the fine threads inside the bottom bracket shell.  Again, here is the process of chasing the threads so that the new BB cartridge can fit snugly.


It was 20 degrees today, so we moved the build indoors


Build in-progress.  the client choose to reuse the stem, bars and brake levers.


Final Photo











In the end, this was a great build with a fantastic client.  A steel frame was saved and reused